Employer Value Proposition: How to Appeal to Candidates with Disabilities

Appeal to Candidates

Consulting firm Towers Watson states, “Top-performing companies create a sustainable [Employee Value Proposition] EVP and total rewards strategy based on the needs, demographics and preferences of their workforce.” As such, employers seeking to attract people with disabilities to their positions should understand the unique needs of this segment. In late 2013, GettingHired conducted a survey of 328 job seekers with disabilities and 255 candidates without disabilities. The results show some critical similarities as well as some important differences between these two segments.

Consistent Employment

56 %
of candidates with disabilities

66%
of candidates without disabilities

Rate consistent employment as most important

The most important factor when choosing between jobs is “the opportunity for consistent employment.” Job seekers are looking for positions that will fulfill their long-term needs for financial and career stability.

Diversity/Disability Friendly Environment

54 %
of candidates with disabilities

26%
of candidates without disabilities

Look for employers and positions that are diversity and disability friendly

Not surprising, candidates with disabilities look for employers and positions that are diversity and disability friendly. Additionally, a diversity/disability friendly environment is ranked the second most important attribute for candidates with disabilities compared to being ranked the seventh most important for candidates without disabilities. Job seekers with disabilities want employer workplaces, including managers and peers, to accept, welcome and accommodate them. Most importantly, people with disabilities want to be treated equally whenever possible.

                                                                                                                   

Location, location, location

47%
of candidates with disabilities

31%
of candidates without disabilities

Look for employers and positions that are easy to access

The third most important attribute for job seekers with disabilities is location. We feel that candidates want a job that is either close to home or easy to access via public transportation. The National Organization on Disability (NOD) sponsored a Harris poll in 2004 that found that just under a third of those with disabilities reported that inadequate transportation was a problem for them; of those individuals, over half said it was a major problem.

Flexibility

54%
of candidates with disabilities

19%
of candidates without disabilities

Look for employers and positions that are easy to access

Like location, flexibility could have many interpretations. We think that candidates want a job and a manager that provides them time for doctors’ appointments, allows them to work from home some or all of the time, or understands public transportation difficulties.

Candidates with disabilities have some unique needs and preferences that employers should appeal to. Recruiters that market their company and write job descriptions with these in mind will be most successful at attracting and retaining job seekers with disabilities.